You are here

Kugluktuk

Kugluktuk, formerly known as Coppermine, is situated along the banks of the Coppermine River and on the shores of the Coronation Gulf. Located north, and slightly west of Yellowknife, Kugluktuk is the most westerly community in Nunavut, with a population of around1,460. In summer, canoeists and rafters take the popular route up the Coppermine River to the scenic Bloody Falls Territorial Historic Park. Because the tundra is close to the tree line, a variety of wildlife can be viewed in the area, including grizzly bears, wolverines and moose, as well as tundra wildlife, such as muskoxen, caribou, foxes and wolves.

The people of Kugluktuk rely heavily on their traditional economy of hunting and fishing to feed and clothe their families for cultural and nutritional well-being. Community residents are also optimistic that the growth sectors of tourism, government and especially mining, will increase Kugluktuk’s economic development, alongside established traditional pursuits.

Photo Gallery

Latest Adaptation Projects by Community

The Nunavut Climate Change Centre is devoted to including Nunavut communities in their projects and outreach.  Over the last few years, we have had the opportunity to visit multiple communities including Rankin Inlet, Arviat and Cape Dorset.

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that changes into various chemical forms through geochemical processes. It is an element that occurs naturally in the environment but with industrialization, humans have altered its cycle by adding more mercury in the water, air, and soil.

What do your elders and community leaders in Nunavut have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

The Nunavut Climate Change Partnership (NCCP) was a collaborative partnership between the Government of Nunavut, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Reosurces Canada to build capacity for community-level adaptation planning.