Clyde River

Clyde River, which is Kangiqtugaapik, or “nice little inlet,” to the Inuit, can be found on the eastern shore of Baffin Island in the shelter of Patricia Bay. A town of just over 900 people, it is located on a flood plain, surrounded by spectacular fiords that stretch all the way into the Barnes Icecap. The mountains, icebergs and glaciers in the Clyde River area attract rock and ice climbers from around the world. There is also a multitude of animals to be seen, including caribou, narwhals and other sea mammals. The Iqalirtuuq National Wildlife Area, a protected bowhead whale sanctuary, is located in Patricia Bay. 

Projects

Examining sea ice, sea ice use, and sea ice change in the communities of Qaanaaq, Greenland, Barrow, Alaska, and Clyde River, Nunavut. Want to get involved? You'll find a complete guide on how to set up a Sea-Ice Monitoring Program for your own community here!

Climate warming is driving a rapid transformation of polar ecosystems, and we urgently need to study the vulnerability of seafloor biodiversity to changes that are already underway.

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

Summary coming soon, but for now please visit http://www.clyderiverweather.org/ to access up-to-date weather information from three weather stations in close proximity to Clyde River.

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

The Geological Survey of Canada has developed a summary database and map of recent permafrost temperatures for Nunavut Canada. The database includes publicly available information from over 100 boreholes.

What do your elders and community leaders have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

A multi-community project studying the changing conditions of frozen ground to depths of 15 metres.

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change

 

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